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Cops tell Nominet to yank 16,000 domains, Nominet complies

Kevin Murphy, November 15, 2017, Domain Registries

Nominet suspended over 16,000 .uk domain names at the request of law enforcement agencies in the last year.

The registry yanked 16,632 domains in the 12 months to October 31, more than double the 8,049 it suspended in the year-earlier period.

The 2016 number was in turn more than double the 2015 number. The 2017 total is more than 16 times the number of suspended domains in 2014, the first year in which Nominet established this cozy relationship with the police.

The large majority of names — 13,616 — were suspended at the request of the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit. Another 2,781 were taken down on the instruction of National Fraud Intelligence Bureau.

Nominet has over 12 million .uk domains under management, so 16,000 names is barely a blip on the radar overall.

But the fact that police can have domains taken down in .uk with barely any friction does not appear to be acting as a deterrent to bad actors when they choose their TLD.

The registry said that just 15 suspensions were reversed — which requires the consent of the reporting law enforcement agency — during the period. That’s basically flat on 2016.

“A suspension is reversed if the offending behavior has stopped and the enforcing agency has since confirmed that the suspension can be lifted,” the company said.

The company does not publish data on how many registrants requested a reversal and didn’t get one, nor does it publish any of the affected domains, so we have no way of knowing whether there’s any ambiguity or overreach in the types of domains the police more or less unilaterally have taken down.

It seems that the only reasons suspension requests do not result in suspensions are when domains have already been suspended or have already been transferred to an IP rights holder by court order. There were 32 of those in the last 12 months, half 2016 levels.

The separate, ludicrously onerous preemptive ban on domains that appear to encourage sexual violence resulted in just two suspensions in the last year, bringing the total new domains suspended under the rule since 2014 to just six.

Some poor bugger at Nominet had to trawl through 3,410 new registrations containing strings such as “rape” in 2017 to achieve that result, up from 2,407 last year.

Nominet suspends over 8,000 “criminal” domains as IP complaints double

Kevin Murphy, November 15, 2016, Domain Policy

Police claims of intellectual property infringement led to the number of .uk domains suspended doubling in 2016, according to Nominet.

Statistics released today show that the .uk registry suspended 8,049 domains in the 12 months to October 31, compared to 3,889 in the year-ago period.

It’s an almost tenfold increase on 2014, when just 948 domains were taken down.

Nominet suspends domains when law enforcement agencies tell it the domains are being used in crime. No court order is required and Nominet rarely refuses a request.

Registrants can have the suspension lifted if they can show to law enforcement that the allegedly criminal behavior has stopped.

The vast majority of the complaints in 2016 again came from the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit, which asked for and got 7,617 names suspended.

Just 13 suspensions were reversed, Nominet said. Most of these were due to sites selling so-called “legal highs” being slow to respond to a change in the law.

The controversial ban on “rape” domains resulted in just one suspension among the 2,407 domains automatically flagged for containing rapey substrings.

Nominet published the following infographic with more stats:

Nominet infographic

Black Ice suspended by ICANN

Kevin Murphy, December 8, 2014, Domain Registrars

A small Israeli registrar has had its registrar accreditation suspended by ICANN.

Black Ice domains, which has a few thousand .com and .net domains under management, failed to comply with an ICANN audit and was overdue on its fees by over $5,000, according to the ICANN notice (pdf).

It won’t be allowed to sell gTLD domains or accept inbound transfers from December 19 to March 18, and may be terminated if it fails to come back into compliance.

The registrar is the fourth to have its accreditation suspended by ICANN in 2014. The organization has terminated a further seven registrars, down on the 11 terminated in the whole of 2013.

Eleven domains suspended under .uk anti-rape rules

Kevin Murphy, December 8, 2014, Domain Registries

Nominet has suspended and permanently blocked 11 “rape” domain names in .uk since introducing a controversial policy earlier this year.

The company today disclosed that nine pre-existing domains were suspended immediately following the introduction of the rules in May. Another two have been blocked since then.

The policy calls for Nominet to ban any domain name that seems to “promote or incite serious sexual offences”.

Examples of such domains given by Lord MacDonald, who compiled the review that led to the policy, included rapeme.co.uk, rapemyteacher.co.uk and rapeporn.co.uk.

Nominet now automatically scans all new .uk registrations for keywords that may be a cause for concern. These are then manually reviewed to weed out the false positives, which could include for example domains that contain the word “grape” or “therapist”.

The false positive level is very high. According to a Nominet report (pdf) this week, 1,029 domains have been automatically flagged since May, only two of which were then suspended.

The policy was introduced following articles in some of the UK’s right-wing tabloids and pressure from government ministers.

Nominet also disclosed this week that 948 domains have been suspended for “criminal activity” in the last six months.

Under Nominet rules, such domains are suspended merely upon notification by the law enforcement agencies that the domain in question is suspected of harboring criminal activity. Unlike elsewhere in the world, no court order is required.

“Criminal activity” means intellectual property infringement in the vast majority of cases.

Of those 948 suspended names, 839 were suspended after complaints from the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit. Another 102 were yanked following notices from the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency. The remaining 7 complaints came from the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau.