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Canada shrugs over .sucks

Kevin Murphy, June 12, 2015, 09:28:09 (UTC), Domain Registries

The Canadian trade regulator has sent ICANN a big old “Whatever” in response to queries about the legalities of .sucks.

The response, sent by Industry Canada’s deputy minister John Knubley yesterday, basically says if the intellectual property lobby doesn’t like .sucks it can always take its complaints to the courts.

Other than opening and closing paragraphs of pleasantries, this is all Knubley’s letter (pdf) says:

Canada’s laws provide comprehensive protections for all Canadians. Canada has intellectual property, competition, criminal law and other relevant legal frameworks in place to protect trademark owners, competitors, consumers and individuals. These frameworks are equally applicable to online activities and can provide recourse, for example, to trademark owners concerned about the use of the dotSucks domains, provided that trademark owners can demonstrate that the use of dotSucks domains infringes on a trademark. Intellectual property rights are privately held and are settled privately by the courts.

There’s not much to go on in there; it could quite easily be a template letter.

But it seems that Vox Populi Registry has been cleared to go ahead with the launch of .sucks, despite IP owner complaints, at least as far as the US and Canadian regulators are concerned.

The Federal Trade Commission was equally noncommittal in its response to ICANN two weeks ago.

Vox Populi is based in Canada. It’s still not entirely clear why the FTC was asked its opinion.

ICANN had asked both agencies for comment on .sucks’ legality after its Intellectual Property Constituency raised concerns about Vox Pop’s “predatory” pricing.

Pricing for .sucks names in sunrise starts at around $2,000.

ICANN told DI in April that it was in “fact finding” mode, trying to see if Vox Pop was in breach of any laws or its Registry Agreement.

The .sucks domain is due to hit general availability one week from now, June 19, with a suggested retail price of $250 a year.

If anything, the $250 says much more about Vox Pop’s business model than the sunrise fees, in my opinion.

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